Which Disney Film Featured A Pet Goldfish Named Cleo?

Which Disney Film Featured A Pet Goldfish Named Cleo
Cleo is Geppetto’s pet goldfish in Disney’s 1940 animated film, Pinocchio.

Which Disney father has a Cleo the fish?

Geppetto’s pet goldfish in the 1940 Disney animated film Pinocchio is named Cleo.

Why did the original Pinocchio endure such cruel treatment? According to the biographical note in the new edition of Everyman’s, Carlo Collodi never had children. Anyone who reads this book will comprehend why. Collodi was averse to children. Specifically, boys are filthy little rodents.

  1. Every boy in Pinocchio is a moron, a disobedient, a glutton, and a scumbag.
  2. But the worst is Pinocchio himself.
  3. Collodi labels him a “rascal,” “imp,” “scapegoat,” “disgrace,” “ragamuffin,” and “proven rogue.” The loving father of Pinocchio, the carpenter Geppetto, laments, “Poor boy!” The first thing the puppet does after its birth is to mock Geppetto.

Then, Pinocchio steals the wig from the elderly man. The bad behavior of Pinocchio is not intended to be charming or endearing. This is intended as a warning. The 1881 publication of the story by Collodi was originally intended to be a tragedy. It concluded with the execution of the puppet.

  • The Fox and the Cat, Pinocchio’s enemies, bind his arms, place a noose around his neck, and hang him from the branch of an oak tree.
  • A tempestuous northerly wind began to blow and roar enragedly, and it beat the poor puppet from side to side, causing him to swing violently, like a wedding bell ringing.

And the swinging caused him to experience terrible spasms. He ran out of air and could no longer speak. He closed his eyes, opened his mouth, stretched his legs, let out a long shiver, and hung rigid and unconscious. The conclusion. Not how you remember Pinocchio, right? Me neither.

I’ve always pictured him as a cheerful little puppet whose only wish is to be transformed into a real boy. This is the Pinocchio portrayed in Walt Disney’s 1940 adaptation, which whitewashed Collodi’s original story. It is difficult to fault Disney; Pinocchio is a horrible child. Disney became so frustrated with Collodi’s story early in the project that he halted production.

Disney concluded that it was unsuitable for children because Pinocchio was too arrogant, too wise, and too puppet-like to be sympathetic. A compromise was finally reached. Pinocchio’s wish would be granted immediately. In the end, he would not be portrayed as a puppet but as a real boy, and a kind, endearing one at that.

  1. Similarly, the minor nameless character “Talking-Cricket” became Jiminy Cricket, a tiny bald-headed man who serves as the puppet’s conscience.
  2. In the book, when the cricket reprimands Pinocchio for rebelling against his father, Pinocchio uses a hammer to crush the cricket’s head.
  3. And Disney transformed a single scene — Pinocchio’s nose growing when he lies — into a central motif.

The moral of the film is that you will find salvation if you are courageous, honest, and listen to your conscience. The moral of Collodi is that if you behave improperly and disobey adults, you will be bound, tortured, and killed. Pinocchio is not only hanged for his sins, but he is also robbed, kidnapped, stabbed, whipped, starved, imprisoned, punched in the head, and his legs are burned off.

  • However, psychological abuse is worse.
  • Throughout the story, he is led to believe that he has murdered both his “father” (Geppetto) and his “mother” (the Blue Fairy).
  • Collodi describes each of Pinocchio’s misfortunes in loving, dramatic detail.
  • When Pinocchio is caught in an iron trap, “stars of every hue danced before his eyes” During one of his many episodes of starvation, Pinocchio’s stomach resembles a five-month-old apartment that has been left unoccupied.
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Other elaborate humiliations include being dipped “five or six times” in flour until “he was white from head to toe and resembled a puppet made of plaster” in preparation for being fried. As a dog, he is fitted with a “large collar covered in brass knobs” and confined in a kennel.

And, after being transformed into a donkey, he is forced to perform absurd dances and jump through hoops on stage while dressed as a woman. Collodi’s sadistic glee in these scenes is contagious; they are the book’s richest and most entertaining passages by far. In this way, Pinocchio is similar to Heinrich Hoffmann’s Struwelpeter and Hillaire Belloc’s Cautionary Verses, in which bad things happen to bad children.

Collodi, on the other hand, lacks the delicacy of Hoffmann and Belloc; he is harsher and more malicious. Even the most inattentive young reader of Pinocchio cannot miss Collodi’s message, as he rephrases it in nearly every chapter. As stated by the Blue Fairy in the conclusion of the book, boys who tenderly minister to their parents and assist them in their misery and infirmities are worthy of praise and affection, even if they cannot be cited as examples of obedience and good behavior.

Try to perform better in the future, and you will experience happiness. There is some discussion of becoming a “real boy” at the end, but it feels like an afterthought. The last two-thirds of the book were actually an afterthought. Pinocchio was first serialized in the weekly newspaper for children, Giornale dei bambini, where it gained a large following.

After the 15th installment, however, when Pinocchio was hanged, Collodi’s young readers were horrified. His publishers compelled him to expand the story, reviving Pinocchio through the intervention of a lovely child with blue hair (the character that later morphs into the Blue Fairy).

  • Additionally, Collodi changed the genre by rewriting his tragedy as a black comedy.
  • He reached a compromise: Pinocchio’s life would be spared, but his punishments would increase in baroqueness and brutality.
  • Collodi, who had previously written satirical fiction and worked as a civil servant, started writing for children because “adults are too difficult to please.” He enticed his young readers with fantastical descriptions of carriages “lined with whipped cream, custard, and vanilla wafers” and idyllic settings in the hedonistic “Land of Boobies,” where there are no adults and summer vacation lasts from January 1 to December 31.

Pinocchio is the hero of child slackers and rebels everywhere when he is left to his own devices. But the enjoyment is short-lived. Then the violence commences. Collodi may have intended to entertain his young readers, but it is their parents who have the final, maniacal laugh: Why did the original Pinocchio endure such cruel treatment?

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Where is the fish Cleo from?

Cleo is Geppetto’s goldfish in the 1940 Disney animated film Pinocchio.

This page is for “Princess Ariel.” For the Thundarr the Barbarian character, see Thundarr the Barbarian.

Ariel
The Little Mermaid character
Ariel as she appears in her mermaid form in The Little Mermaid (1989).
First appearance The Little Mermaid (1989)
Created by Ron Clements John Musker
Based on The Mermaid from the Hans Christian Andersen ‘s fairytale
Portrayed by Marietta DePrima ( Little Mermaid’s Island ) Sierra Boggess ( Broadway debut) Chelsea Morgan Stock (Broadway finale) Auliʻi Cravalho ( The Little Mermaid Live! ) Halle Bailey ( live-action film )
Voiced by Jodi Benson Kathryn Haywood ( Ariel’s Majestic Journey )
Age 16 years (first film by Walt Disney Animation Studios ) 28 years ca. (second film)
In-universe information
Alias The Little Mermaid
Species Human (via magical transformation ) Mermaid (originally)
Title Queen of Eric’s kingdom Princess of Atlantica
Affiliation Disney Princesses
Family King Triton (father) Queen Athena (mother) Attina, Alana, Adella, Aquata, Arista and Andrina (older sisters)
Spouse Prince Eric
Children Melody
Relatives Poseidon (grandfather) Neptune (great-grandfather) Crustacea (great-aunt)
Nationality Atlantican

Ariel is a fictional character in the 28th animated feature film from Walt Disney Pictures, The Little Mermaid (1989). Jodi Benson provides the voice of Ariel in all official animated appearances and merchandise. Ariel, the fourth Disney Princess, is the seventh-born daughter of King Triton and Queen Athena of the Atlantica kingdom of merpeople.

In the first film, she is frequently defiant and yearns to be a part of the human world. Together, she and Prince Eric, whom she rescued from a shipwreck, have a daughter named Melody. She is the first princess created during the Disney Renaissance. Based on the protagonist of Hans Christian Andersen’s 1837 fairy tale “The Little Mermaid,” the character in the 1989 animated film adaptation was given a different personality.

Some publications, such as Time, have criticized Ariel for being too devoted to Eric, while others, such as Empire, have praised the character for her rebellious nature, a departure from the roles of previous Disney Princesses. In the upcoming live-action adaptation of the original 1989 film, Halle Bailey will portray a live-action version of the character.

Is Dory a female or a male?

Trivia – According to director Andrew Stanton on the Finding Nemo DVD audio commentary, Dory was originally intended to be a male character. However, when Stanton went home to write the script, his wife was watching The Ellen DeGeneres Show, and after hearing DeGeneres’ voice, he decided to change Dory to a female character and cast her in the role, which she accepted.

  • Before Ellen DeGeneres was cast, Johnny Depp, Will Ferrell, Jim Carrey, Eddie Murphy, and the late Robin Williams were all considered for the role of Dory, before she was recast as a female.
  • Dory has made cameo appearances in a number of Boom! Studios’ Disney comics, including The Incredibles (in an underwater scene) and Darkwing Duck (on the final page of issue 7), where she and other Disney sea creatures react with fear to the return of the villain Paddywhack.
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On the Disney website, Dory is incorrectly identified as a Yellowtail Tang. Despite the fact that she has a yellow tail, she is a blue tang, a distinct species of fish. In order of appearance, Dory gave Nemo the nicknames Chico, Fabio, Bingo, Harpo, and Elmo.

  1. The first four are references to the Marx Brothers (excluding Groucho), while the fifth is a reference to the red Muppet monster from Sesame Street.
  2. Many individuals believe that goldfish have a poor short-term memory.
  3. Despite the fact that she is not a goldfish, this may be related to her amnesia-like condition.

Dory is fluent in 42 fish dialects. In the musical Finding Nemo, Dory wears mismatched socks. Left: the fish toy. Right: Dory’s primary colors are reversed. The toy swimming fish that Nemo and Marlin encounter in the tank outside the Institute Gift Shop has a green body and a magenta tail, resembling a blue tang with its primaries switched. With over 24 million likes, Dory is the most popular Disney or Pixar character on Facebook.

This page is for “Princess Ariel.” For the Thundarr the Barbarian character, see Thundarr the Barbarian.

Ariel
The Little Mermaid character
Ariel as she appears in her mermaid form in The Little Mermaid (1989).
First appearance The Little Mermaid (1989)
Created by Ron Clements John Musker
Based on The Mermaid from the Hans Christian Andersen ‘s fairytale
Portrayed by Marietta DePrima ( Little Mermaid’s Island ) Sierra Boggess ( Broadway debut) Chelsea Morgan Stock (Broadway finale) Auliʻi Cravalho ( The Little Mermaid Live! ) Halle Bailey ( live-action film )
Voiced by Jodi Benson Kathryn Haywood ( Ariel’s Majestic Journey )
Age 16 years (first film by Walt Disney Animation Studios ) 28 years ca. (second film)
In-universe information
Alias The Little Mermaid
Species Human (via magical transformation ) Mermaid (originally)
Title Queen of Eric’s kingdom Princess of Atlantica
Affiliation Disney Princesses
Family King Triton (father) Queen Athena (mother) Attina, Alana, Adella, Aquata, Arista and Andrina (older sisters)
Spouse Prince Eric
Children Melody
Relatives Poseidon (grandfather) Neptune (great-grandfather) Crustacea (great-aunt)
Nationality Atlantican

Ariel is a fictional character in the 28th animated feature film from Walt Disney Pictures, The Little Mermaid (1989). Jodi Benson provides the voice of Ariel in all official animated appearances and merchandise. Ariel, the fourth Disney Princess, is the seventh-born daughter of King Triton and Queen Athena of the Atlantica kingdom of merpeople.

In the first film, she is frequently defiant and yearns to be a part of the human world. Together, she and Prince Eric, whom she rescued from a shipwreck, have a daughter named Melody. She is the first princess created during the Disney Renaissance. Based on the protagonist of Hans Christian Andersen’s 1837 fairy tale “The Little Mermaid,” the character in the 1989 animated film adaptation was given a different personality.

Some publications, such as Time, have criticized Ariel for being too devoted to Eric, while others, such as Empire, have praised the character for her rebellious nature, a departure from the roles of previous Disney Princesses. In the upcoming live-action adaptation of the original 1989 film, Halle Bailey will portray a live-action version of the character.